Want to Clean the Air You Breathe?

Overall, one tree produces nearly 260 pounds of oxygen each year.

And, according to The Nature Conservancy, a tree can also remove up to 24% of polluting particulate matter near the tree. Inhaled particulate matter, such as from automobiles or road dust, can cause a wide range of health issues. The solution? Plant trees in your yard to help ensure a healthier environment right where you live.

A tree can absorb as much as 48 pounds of carbon dioxide per year and can sequester 1 ton of carbon dioxide by the time it reaches 40 years old.
Having large trees in yards along streets increases a home’s value from 3 percent to 15 percent.

Your trees will provide you with more than just clean air to breathe, however. As is often said, he who plants a tree plants hope. In addition to hope, a tree adds other incredible value.

Consider this from the National Arbor Day foundation:

  • The net cooling effect of a young, healthy tree is equivalent to ten room-size air conditioners operating 20 hours a day. (U.S. Department of Agriculture)
  • A mature tree can often have an appraised value of between $1,000 and $10,000. (Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers)
  • Having large trees in yards along streets increases a home’s value from 3 percent to 15 percent. (Wolf, Kathleen L, PhD, University of Washington (2007) City Trees and Property Values. Arborist News. 16, 4:34-36)
One acre of forest absorbs six tons of carbon dioxide and puts out four tons of oxygen. This is enough to meet the annual needs of 18 people.
  • One acre of forest absorbs six tons of carbon dioxide and puts out four tons of oxygen. This is enough to meet the annual needs of 18 people. (U.S. Department of Agriculture)
  • There are about 60– to 200-million spaces along our city streets where trees could be planted. This translates to the potential to absorb 33 million more tons of CO2 every year, and saving $4 billion in energy costs. (National Wildlife Federation)|
  • The planting of trees means improved water quality, resulting in less runoff and erosion. This allows more recharging of the ground water supply. Wooded areas help prevent the transport of sediment and chemicals into streams. (USDA Forest Service)

Some great resources to get you started:
Native Trees of Minnesota
Choosing the Right Tree
A Field Guide to Trees

Guide to Minnesota Trees
Trees and Shrubs

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