By

leslie
“My wife and I recently fulfilled our goal of building a planet-friendly home for our golden years. Sustainable energy consumption and aging in place were our “must-haves.”
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“What if each American landowner made it a goal to convert half of his or her lawn to productive native plant communities?
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All winter long I dreamed of spring planting. I purchased countless seed packets with big plans to grow organic soybeans to make tempeh, tomatoes to can, blue corn for cornmeal, cabbage for sauerkraut, and dry beans to last our small family throughout the next cold season.
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Willows are one of the last of our shrubs and trees to lose their leaves in autumn. They turn shades of yellow—anywhere from greenish-yellow to whitish-yellow. As earlier fall colors start to paint our landscapes, the willows offer a decidedly green contrast in a diversity of shades depending on the species.
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“It is increasingly difficult to find ‘grassland’ birds, such as meadowlarks, within metro areas. Empty fields are typically seen as opportunities for more urban development.
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“A tree’s most important means of staying connected to other trees is a ‘woodwide web’ of soil fungi that connects vegetation in an intimate network that allows the sharing of an enormous amount of information and goods.
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“Last fall, my brother and I took our parents to the North Shore of Lake Superior to celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary.
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The ubiquitous American goldfinch can be found just about anywhere, at least sometime during the year, throughout the U.S. and southern Canada.
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Kelly Cartwright, Ph.D., is a biology professor at the College of Lake County in Grayslake, Illinois where she teaches environmental biology, general biology, botany, and introduction to sustainability.
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